“Are not my days few? Then cease, and leave me alone, that I may find a little cheer before I go—and I shall not return— to the land of darkness and deep shadow, the land of gloom like thick darkness, like deep shadow without any order, where light is as thick darkness.” Job 10:20-22

Over the months, I did think more about anger. In some ways, I delved deep into thinking about it. Anger is a normal emotion. Anger is not a negative sign. Grief leads many into anger. Bottom line, God can handle it if you’re angry at him, and he can help you if you’re angry at something or someone else. He’s not knocked off center by our anger.

But a fair question remains: Who deserves the anger? Is it God? Or are you mad at the person who died? In the case of foul play, are you angry at the perpetrator who caused the death? If an accident, who should be the object of your anger?

I say I haven’t gotten angry. That’s not totally true. The more I probed into anger I realized there is an appropriate reason for anger and appropriate objects of anger.

Let me explain.

One of the healthy ways I coached myself was to remind myself that my micro-story is tragic, but my macro-story is beautiful. Even better said, the macro-story that God is orchestrating throughout history is still beautiful. Inherent in that story is an eternal struggle between good and evil, between God and Satan. Satan along with Adam and Eve had an encounter known as the Fall of Man, and death was introduced.

I can get angry at the very existence of death. That is a godly response! I can get angry at sin that resulted in death in the world. That, too, is an appropriate response. Anger at death will aid you in respecting the value of life. Anger at death has caused a deeper love of those in my family. My love for my family has grown as a direct result of my loss. My love for my family has grown as a result of considering the wife, daughter, mother, and sister we as a family have lost. I hate death! It is a result and sign of Satan’s and mankind’s rebellion. Anger at sin has caused a new level of recognition of my own sinfulness. Anger at sin will aid you in sanctification—your own discipleshipif you allow God to use it in your life. Anger at sin has caused me to pray differentlymore passionately and desperately!

“And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.” Matthew 6:13

In short, anger at death has caused a renewed love of life itself and for those in my life. Anger at sin has brought an opportunity for growth in holiness and Christlikeness.

Second, I can appropriately get angry at our enemy, Satan. He rebelled and misled Adam and Eve. We call him our enemy because he is against God’s ways and seeks to keep us from being transferred from the kingdom of darkness into the Son’s Kingdom.

“He has delivered us from the domain of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son…” Colossians 1:13

I can embrace God even more intimately as I express anger at our enemy. If there is blame to be assigned, our enemy is the object of appropriate anger. I resist the temptation to turn my back on God. I embrace the idea of turning my back more emphatically on Satan. Death should never cause us to get or stay angry at God. Death, suffering, or loss of any kind should cause us to run to God. It should cause us to have anger at sin, death, and Satan.

In short, loss should be a clarion call to run from Satan and to run to God.

As I explored anger, I recognized there is a good role or place for anger. Loss puts life in perspective. Loss puts sin in a different light. Loss can reinvigorate vision and purpose for the life I have remaining. Anger can animate these lessons solidifying them in a mourner’s heart and mind.

There is, as it turns out, an appropriate place for anger.

 “If I am to live in the flesh, that means fruitful labor for me. Yet which I shall choose I cannot tell.” Philippians 1:22

6 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    Yet another great perspective:
    “If there is blame to be assigned, our enemy is the object of appropriate anger. I resist the temptation to turn my back on God. I embrace the idea of turning my back more emphatically on Satan. Death should never cause us to get or stay angry at God. Death, suffering, or loss of any kind should cause us to run to God.”
    I’ve seen this exemplified in your life. Thank you.

  2. Anonymous

    Nice try D, but you’ve fallen way short. There is no useful or redemptive reason or rationale for anger, whatsoever. Chill my friend, God is with you!

    Murph

    • D. Ray

      Murph, we may have to agree to disagree…however, I am speaking as carefully as I can regarding this subject. Anger is an identified aspect or phase of grief. Many people face it. I have not had to face it. See my entry two weeks ago…see below. However, we are told to be angry but not to sin (Eph 4:26). There is a difference. However, I do sense a righteous indignation, or anger, at sin, death, and Satan. I don’t mean a ranting out-of-control anger. But I am steeled against it. I am resolute. Death has reinvigorated my resolve. Thank you for taking the time to comment. I agree that God is with me…and you as we walk our journey of loss. Anger, Vulnerability, and Self-Care

  3. Annette

    Jesus wants us to be free, that was what He created us for. The Bible says we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ (Romans 5:1) Peace with God, no anger, no fear, no blame, just peace. What a mighty man of God you are my friend. My heart’s prayer is for our God to continue to use you to share and love on His people. Prayers.

    • D. Ray

      Thank you, Annette.

  4. Anonymous

    Well stated D Ray.
    I, also, have not faced anger toward our righteous God, but anger to the one who wants to kill and destroy all that we have and are.
    God wants to bless us and give us a future and whatever we must go through to be what HE wants us to be is worth the pain and loss that we endure
    Thank you again for ministering to my heart in sharing yours.

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